Guarding and proclaiming the unchanging truth in a changing world

Devotion

We are grateful this month of July for Lift Up Your Hearts Devotional contributions from Caroline Seed.

Caroline and Richard Seed have been mission partners with the Church Mission Society (Britain) for the past two decades and have taught in colleges and universities in West, East and southern Africa. They are now based at George Whitefield College in Cape Town from where they run Theological Education Development Services (TEDS), a mission service that provides training in teaching and learning for theological colleges in Africa. They are also working with the Gafcon Theological Education Network (TEN), to provide lecturer training in Spanish and Portuguese for theological colleges in Chile and Brazil. 

Over the past four years, Caroline has been assisting a team of authors from East Africa to write a commentary on 1 John for use by pastors and theological students who live in non-Christian majority contexts. Although these devotions are not rooted in that specific context, the illustrations have all been drawn from experiences of theological education in Africa and are in that way, contextual. You will find yourself eager each day to read the next story setting the stage for the devotional. 

Caroline’s team has written the commentary with the assumption that 1 John is written for oral delivery as a sermon-letter. She refers to the key idea “Do not be like Cain who was of the evil one and murdered his brother” (1 John 3:12), which enables oral hearers to remember the message by pegging it onto an already well-known Old Testament story. This structuring device will be explained in Devotion 12 that reflects on 1 John 3:12.

Although each devotion has a key verse, readers and listeners are encouraged to read the set passage as this will make it easier to follow the thoughts.   

Para leer las devocionales en Espanol, haga clic aquí.
Para ler os devocionais em Português, clique aqui.

27th May 2020
Cyril of Alexandria was born in the small town of Didouseya, Egypt in 376. At the age of 38 he became the patriarch of Alexandria, a turbulent cosmopolitan city with over a half million inhabitants...
26th May 2020
Leo the Great, a native of Tuscany, was elected bishop of Rome in 440 and is perhaps best known for meeting with Attila the Hun in 452 and persuading him to turn back from his invasion of Italy. The...
25th May 2020
Gregory of Nyssa was born in 335 to a devout aristocratic Christian family in Cappadocia, which had suffered persecution for their faith. Gregory's grandfather was martyred, his parents had their...
22nd May 2020
John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople from 397-407, was one of the early Church's greatest preachers, whose homilies were written down by stenographers and widely circulated. Many hundreds of...
21st May 2020
Augustine was born in North Africa to a pagan Roman father and a Christian Berber mother. He spent his youth as a true pagan and in his Confessions, describes his time in a heretical sect in Rome and...
20th May 2020
Today is the last Rogation Day and the last day of our Easter devotions. For Thursday is Ascension Day, and in Cranmer’s Book of Common Prayer it marked the beginning of the short season of...
19th May 2020
The Tuesday following the Fifth Sunday after Easter was traditionally one of three Rogation Days devoted to repentance from sin, thanksgiving in the light of the goodness of God, and prayer for...
18th May 2020
The three days following the Fifth Sunday after Easter are traditionally set aside for petitioning God to prosper the efforts of our hands, especially as it relates to sowing crops in the Spring in...
15th May 2020
The traditional Epistle reading appointed for the Fourth Sunday after Easter expresses that special theme so very dear to Cranmer and his fellow Reformers - the intertwining of Scripture, salvation...
14th May 2020
True joy - that is the ultimate goal sought in the Collect appointed for the Fourth Sunday after Easter. This traditional prayer defines real joy as the product of longing to do God’s will and...
13th May 2020
This week’s collect is a helpful reminder that Cranmer was convinced that daily bible reading was the key to growth in godliness, since the Holy Spirit worked through God’s Word to transform us from...
12th May 2020
At the heart of Thomas Cranmer’s theology was his concern for the affections of the heart. He was deeply influenced by Medieval English Spirituality.  Richard Rolle (d.
11th May 2020
Thomas Cranmer’s translation of the traditional Latin Collect appointed for the Fourth Sunday after Easter addresses one of the major themes of his writings - the transformation of the affections. We...
8th May 2020
As highlighted by his reuse of the traditional Collect appointed for the Third Sunday after Easter, Cranmer wanted the English people to become dedicated bible readers. That way, they would...
7th May 2020
In the context of the English Reformation, the Collect appointed for the Third Sunday after Easter sought a reformation not only in the hearts of the English people but also in their church’s faith...
6th May 2020
Cranmer’s reuse of the traditional collect appointed for the Third Sunday in Easter took on new meaning in the light of the English Reformation. Like the ancient church, the “light of thy truth” was...
5th May 2020
Thomas Cranmer was fully aware that the deceitful “devices and desires of our own hearts” would all too often lead us into the error of approval-earning, even though it was a “ready way to...
4th May 2020
As we have seen, Cranmer would want Anglicans to concentrate on what God has saved them for. Because only by focusing on the benefits of Christ’s death and resurrection will believers find the proper...

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